Beijing Daxing International Airport

Beijing Daxing International Airport

Beijing Daxing International Airport (BDIA) is a new airport in the Daxing district 46km south of the city centre. Developed to alleviate congestion at the capital’s existing airport, BDIA will be a major transport hub for the region with the world’s fastest growing demand for international travel and is fully integrated within the country’s expanding transport network.

BDIA’s 700,000m2 passenger terminal includes an 80,000m? ground transportation centre offering direct connections to Beijing, the national high-speed rail network and local train services, providing a catalyst for economic development in Tianjin and Hebei Province. Recently assigned the airport code PKX by the International Air Transport Association, Beijing Daxing sets a new standard in air transport services, serving the region’s growing population within a compact and efficient passenger terminal that is adaptable for future growth.

Echoing principles within traditional Chinese architecture that organize interconnected spaces around ua central courtyard, the terminal’s design guides all passengers seamlessly through the relevant departure, arrival or transfer zones towards the grand courtyard at its centre – a multi-layered meeting space at the heart of the terminal. Eight flowing forms within the terminal’s vaulted roof reach to the ground to support the structure and bring natural light within, directing all passengers towards the central courtyard. Natural light also enters the terminal via a network of linear skylights that provide an intuitive system of navigation throughout the building, guiding passengers to and from their departure gates. Structural spans of up to 100m provide the terminal’s generous public spaces and allow the highest degree of flexibility for any future reconfiguration.

The compact radial configuration of the terminal allows a maximum number of aircraft to be parked directly at the terminal with minimum distances from the centre of the building, providing exceptional convenience for passengers and flexibility in operations. 79 gates with airbridges connect directly to the terminal while BDIA’s facilities can quickly process the passengers of six full A380 aircraft simultaneously. Five aircraft piers radiate directly from the terminal’s main central court where all passenger services and amenities are located, enabling passengers to walk the comparatively short distances through the airport without the need for automated shuttle trains.

As a result, the terminal’s compact design minimises distances between check-in and gate, as well as connections between gates for transferring passengers. This radial configuration ensures the farthest boarding gate can be accessed in a walking time of less than 8 minutes. Photovoltaic power generation is installed throughout the airport to provide a minimum capacity of at least 10MW. BDIA’s centralised heating with waste heat recovery supported by a composite ground- source heat pump system incorporating a concentrated  energy supply area of nearly 2.5 million m.

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Sleuk Rith Institute

Sleuk Rith Institute

The Sleuk Rith Institute, a new institution and genocide memorial in the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh, brings together a museum, research centre, graduate school, document archives and research library. The vision of Youk Chhang, a human rights activist and investigator of the Khmer Rouge atrocities, the Sleuk Rith Institute was founded by Chhang as a focus for reflection, healing and reconciliation as well as an enlightening educational and research facility dedicated to commemorating the lives of the past by building a better future creates a new dialogue with the emerging The Sleuk Rith Institute will house the Documentation Centre of Cambodia’s one million documents in its archives and, as the largest collection of genocide related material in Southeast Asia, will become a global centre for education and research into the documentation, causes and prevention of genocide. Youk Chhang is the Founder of the Sleuk Rith Institute and Executive Director of the Documentation.

Centre of Cambodia, which was established by Yale University. The Institute’s name Sleuk Rith means “the power of the leaves’. Cambodian religious leaders have used dried leaves for centuries and scholars to document history, disseminate knowledge, and preserve culture during periods of harsh rule and grave peril. During the 1970s Youk Chhang, at the age of 15, was a prisoner under the Khmer Rouge and members of his family were victims of the regime. Through his Documentation Centre of Cambodia, he has spent more than a decade amassing details of atrocities committed by the former Cambodian regime, The Democratic Kampuchea (DK), which is also known as the Khmer Rouge. Despite the tragic history explored at the institute, Youk Chhang’s research led to the very considered brief for a building that promoted reflection and reconciliation, and also inspired and innovated.

“Cambodia will never escape its history, but it does not need to be enslaved by it. Post-conflict societies have to move on,” he says. This brief required a direction that breaks from some of the stereotypes associated with genocide memorial architecture.

“In the context of genocide and mass atrocity, memorial architecture has tended to reflect the evil and misfortune of the historical period it represents,” he says. “In this sense, the architecture’s legacy is dark, sombre, and firmly oriented to the past.” “We were keen to create a forward-looking institution that deviates from the distress-invoking, quasi-industrial, harshness of most existing genocide memorial models. This is not to criticize or denigrate such models but, instead, to emphasize that in light of a Cambodia’s rich cultural and religious traditions, we must move in a different and more positively-oriented direction.”

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520 West 28th Street

520 West 28th Street

There is a powerful urban dynamic between the streets of New York and the High Line, a layered civic realm that has developed over generations and in many iterations. 520 West 28th conveys this contextual relationship, applying new ideas and concepts to create the latest evolution of the site’s rich history. The split levels of the design define varied living spaces and echoes the multiple layers of civic space on 28th Street and the High Line. * Disclaimer: Dame Zaha Hadid, Pritzker Prize winning (2004) UK licensed architect, designer, and educator was not licensed to practice architecture in the state of New York. For her work on 520 W. 28th, she is credited as designer.

Zaha Hadid worked in close collaboration with a New York City-based firm, Ismael Leyva Architects, who functioned as the architect for this projectcollar/blue collar spatial divisions The split levels of the design define varied living spaces and echoes the multiple layers of civic space on 28th Street and the High Line. These split levels are expressed within the interlocking chevrons of 520 West 28th’s hand-crafted steel façade which carries the spirit of Chelsea’s industrial past; its detailed workmanship continues the venerable tradition within New York’s historic architecture of enhancing the public realm.

Designed and constructed with a practiced understanding of material qualities and manufacturing techniques, the façade conveys the attention to detail evident throughout 520 West 28th-brushed and tinted by hand to resonate with the adjacent structures of the High Line and its neighbourhood. The 11-storey 520 West 28th houses 39 residences with 11-foot coffered ceilings, tailored interiors that incorporate Boffi kitchens by Zaha Hadid Design, and integrated technologies including automated valet parking and storage.

With multiple cores to give most residences private elevator lobbies, the amenities of 520 West 28th include the wellness level with spa and 25-yard sky-lit lap pool, sculpture garden, and entertainment suite with IMAX theatre. Within an established community of over 350 art galleries that has seen the High Line’s transformation from abandoned freight rail line to public park, 520 West 28th embodies a commitment to uphold the distinctive character of its neighbourhood; creating a building with its own architectural presence, yet very much of its surroundings.

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BMW Central Building

BMW Central Building

Our Central Building for BMW constituted a radical reinterpretation of the traditional office– transforming the building and the functions it contains into a more dynamic, engaging ‘nerve-centre’ or ‘communication knoť – funneling all movement around the manufacturing complex through a space that transcends conventional white collar/blue collar spatial divisions We conceived the Central Building, positioned between other existing or planned structures, as an orientating and animating force field, a compression chamber through which all movement converged, from the cycles and trajectories of workers to the production line itself, which traversed this central point.

Within the building, following a primary ‘scissor-section’ strategy, two sequences of terraced plates step up like giant staircases from north to south and from south to north, creating a continuous connection. One cascade begins close to the public lobby overlooking the forum to reach the first floor in the middle of the building. The second starts with the cafeteria at the south end, moving up to meet the first cascade then all the way up to the space projecting over the entrance. At the bottom of the void between the floors the auditing area – a central focus of attention.

Above the void, half-finished cars are open to view moving along their tracks between the surrounding production units. In stark contrast to conventional, functionally-exclusive offices, employees are integrated through transparent internal organisation that mixes functions and traditional status groups, from engineering to administrative, white collar to blue collar – preventing the establishment of exclusive domains. A large car park is transformed into a dynamic spectacle in its own right, showcasing the lively, sparkling, moving field of car bodies in the aarrangement of parking lots. Here, cars swoop underneath and set visitors down as they are greeted by views through the glazed public lobby, deep into the building.

BMW’s bold objective functional industrial architecture into a new ‘aesthetic’ to use the new Central Building at its Leipzig manufacturing centre as a transition zone between manufacturing halls and public spaces, from which all the complex’s activities gathered and branched out.

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